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Pontiac of the Month

GTO TEX's 1966 GTO

2018 June
of the Month

BearGFR

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BearGFR last won the day on June 18

BearGFR had the most liked content!

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About BearGFR

  • Rank
    Learning to Fly
  • Birthday 03/21/1953

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.garrettfamily.us/gto

Profile Information

  • Location
    South of Springtown, TEXAS

Forever Pontiac

  • Name
    Rob Garrett
  • Gender
    Male
  • Year
    1969
  • Car
    GTO
  • Trim
    FAST
  • Engine
    "400" :)
  • Style
    Coupe
  • Color
    Black

Recent Profile Visitors

2,132 profile views
  1. BearGFR

    Hobbies

    Also big into firearms and target shooting (I'm a certified Training Counselor), just got into reloading, music (I play drums), computers and software, doing all kinds of crap with my tractor (we live in the country on 13.5 acres), got a zillion "home improvement" projects I'm always working on (I did -everything- on this one myself except for building the steel building and spraying the insulation [ I -did- build all of the bathroom including the plumbing and shower]: ) . Used to be heavily involved in the boy scouts program before we moved out here to the sticks - still like to camp and backpack. I'm a certified private pilot although I haven't been current/active in quite a few years, but it's still "on my list" of things to get back into. We love to travel... I'd like to get SCUBA certified...
  2. BearGFR

    POTM Nominations, June 2018

    Ok, I'm in. Let's see, 69 GTO, all work done by yours truly. Numbers matching, stroked to 461 inches, best et to date 11.86 @ 113 mph.
  3. My personal preference is Wix or Mobil One. I care mostly about how well they work, very little about appearance.
  4. Well, something isn't working. I never got any email or other notification about anything else that was needed, or I would have sent it. I had no idea on anything related to the calendar until a couple days ago when I got a notice on Twitter they they're available, even then it took a lot of effort just to find this thread. Do you really believe that 4 people would go to the trouble of entering the contest and then just ignore requests for more material? That alone should tell you that there's a problem with the notification mechanism.
  5. BearGFR

    Experience with Aluminum A/C Compressor

    Hey Rick, I'm running a Sanden on my 69 and it works fine. I have an issue with the fan in my aftermarket unit not moving enough air, but the air itself is nice and cool. Bear
  6. I know it seems hard, but it's not. The only things that actually matter are: 1) When #1 cylinder (front, drivers side) is at TDC on the compression stroke (remember that TDC occurs twice: once on compression, once on exhaust) 2) The rotor inside the distributor is pointed to the terminal on the cap that you have #1 spark plug wire connected to, and 3) The rest of the wires are sequenced counter clockwise according to firing order. That's it. The other items such as which way is the vacuum diaphragm pointing, and which specific terminal you have #1 wire connected to do not matter at all as far as the engine being able to start and run. However, the orientation of the vacuum diaphragm can have an effect on you being able to properly time the engine (it may hit the intake and prevent you from turning the distributor like you need to), and for 100% correct concours level nit-picking restoration the terminal for #1 plug wire should be pointed "more or less" towards the drivers seat. But as long as you have those first 3 items right, the engine should run. A couple of easy ways to identify TDC compression stroke: Remove all the spark plugs and stick a rag or paper towel or something over #1 spark plug hole then crank it over with the starter. When the rag gets blown off, that's TDC compression. Do the same thing, only stick your thumb over the hole and have a buddy crank the engine over. You'll be able to tell when you're at TDC compression. Once you're sure you're at TDC compression on #1, look to see which cap terminal the rotor is pointing at and connect #1 wire to that one. Wire the rest in firing order sequence, working counter-clockwise. You can do this. Bear
  7. BearGFR

    What tires are you running?

    Front: BFG Radials Rear: Nitto NT555R --- all the time.
  8. BearGFR

    Sharing memories with my FP friends...

    I'm so sorry, Pat. My wife and I have been more aware recently of the inevitability of one of us having to go through what you're going through, and just the thought of it is very unsettling to us both. We both wish for you the best that things can possibly be. Bear and Mrs. Bear
  9. BearGFR

    POTM Vote, May 2016

    Nope, sorry. This one is at the Cavanaugh Flight Museum at Addison Airport, near Dallas. For the past couple years the Dallas Area Pontiac Association has held their big annual event, the Pontiac Southern Nationals, on-site at the museum. It's been working out really well. Bear
  10. BearGFR

    POTM Nominations, May 2016

    Ok, I reckon I'll throw mine into the ring for this month. It's a 69 GTO that I've had the pleasure of owning since 1976. (It didn't always look like this) It was my daily driver while I was attending college, then first married. My Dad and I bought this car together (I found it, he had the money) while I was still in school. I started a frame-off restoration in about 1985, got a year or so into that, then life had other plans. The car sat in pieces, in a rented storage unit - for the next 25 years after that. Fast forward (slow forward?) to 2008 when my present wife (angel and true partner that she is) provided substantial encouragement for me to resume the project. It moved under its own power in November, 2011 for the first time since 1985. I did 100% of the work myself: engine, drive train, suspension, body, paint, interior - and every part of that except for the mechanical jobs were my "first time". The car is all numbers matching, even the engine - which was originally your basic "garden variety" YS-coded 400, but I've warmed it up quite a bit by building it as a 461 stroker with solid roller cam, ported Edelbrock RPM heads, and an assortment of other goodies. Oh, and even though I still have all the original parts and could re-build it 100% stock should I ever want to, it's also right now carrying a Moser 9-inch with 3.50 gears and a Wavetrac differential. No way would the original 10-bolt with 3.23's have survived for long behind this engine. My overall goal for the car was to build it as "stock appearing", but capable of inflicting much harm if provoked I also wanted to be able to drive it anywhere, anytime, and be able to dance "just above" the NHRA-mandated roll-bar rule of 11.49. The car has run a best to date E.T. of 11.86 @ 113 mph at Texas Motorplex, we drove it on the "Long Haul" Power Tour in 2013 (and will be catching the last half of the tour in 2016), and I drive it --- not every day, but pretty regularly. Here's a link to my web site that has hundreds of mostly dull and boring photos of the build progression: http://www.garrettfamily.us/gto ...and a link to a YouTube video that also tells the story, including a brief segment that shows that very first drive in 2011 (still on 30 year old tires). If you're REALLY bored and need help sleeping, search YouTube using the term, "Bear's GTO" and you should find a few more.
  11. BearGFR

    65 GTO Project Car

    Dang Rick! I wish I'd seen this sooner. I've been wanting a '65 for a good long while. Bear
  12. BearGFR

    455 Engine Block.

    Like the man done said: D151 = April 15, 1971 - which means it's for the 1971 model year. The engine foundry generally would start casting blocks and parts for the next model year in about June, so an F or G code (thereabouts) would have indicated model year 1972. 485428 = 455, add the YC stamping tells you it would have been used in an automatic transmission car and would have had the 067 cam, 4 barrel, 66 casting heads, nominal 8.2:1 compression ratio, and rated at 325 HP (highest HP rating for any of the 1971 455's). That 21376313 stamping, if you found it down low on the front of the block, next to the timing cover, would be the last digits of the VIN for the car the engine is from. Does it have 4-bolt main caps? Bear
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