Jump to content
Forums Gone... but not forgotten!
Pontiac of the Month

4 bucket 67's 1967 GTO

2019 March
of the Month

  • Welcome to Forever Pontiac

    We are a community of Pontiac enthusiasts. The purpose of our community is to keep alive the Pontiac spirit by sharing (or showing off) our cars, discussing Pontiac, helping each other work on our cars and find information, plus attend various meets/shows/etc... To aid discussion, sharing, event planning and selling of parts/cars/anything, we have various parts of the website to aid this from Forums to an online Garage to Classifieds to even a Document Download Repository. You can find links to these in our navigation above based on what each section helps with (discussion, local events, learning, etc...).

    We invite you to contribute, find help or just view some of our member's amazing cars! Don't forget, we also have great contests from time to time (like our Pontiac of the Month and yearly calendar contest) and our Pontiac This OR That, a fun game where you choose the best of two randomly selected Pontiacs from our online garage.

    We look forward to seeing you around!

Sign in to follow this  
TinIndian

Fun Car Facts Slide Show

Recommended Posts

Tired of these Ads? Register Today!

Think the one that got me was that "the inventor of the cruise control was blind" :lol:


  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was cool, thankz for posting.


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Think the one that got me was that "the inventor of the cruise control was blind" :lol:

Actually Ringo, this is true. While I worked at AC Spark Plug, we built cruise control systems for GM, so I know a little history here. Google the name Ralph Teetor.

Primitive cruise systems existed on cars using governors dating back to the turn of the 19th century. The modern (electro-mechanical) cruise system Teetor invented and patented in 1945 was named the "speedostat". It measured the speed of the driveshaft, and through the use of a bi-direction electric motor connected to the throttle, managed the speed of the vehicle. He installed it commercially for the first time on the '58 Chrysler Imperial.

Teetor was blind since age 5 but he was inspired to build the speedostat since his lawyer had this tendency to speed up and slow down a lot in the cars of the 1930s and 1940s. Teetor was a gifted mechanical and automotive engineer, inventor, and business man. He is even in the Automotive Hall of Fame.

--------------------

The one statement that I am not certain I believe is the last one, about modern engines being so quite that they have to simulate noise through the radio. I would argue that any running, internal combustion engine will make some level of audible noise despite how well it is muffled, dampened, and sound insulated. Making an engine 100% quiet is just cost prohibitive in my opinion.

I will agree with this statement with an electric or hybrid vehicle running on the batteries only. I know this since a fellow Widetracker is a lead engineer on the Volt/Ampera program at GM. He has told me that they had to simulate noises, especially at start-up, to let the driver know the car is on and ready to roll.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Simulated starter grinding noise? Ya already pushed the on button dummy! :lol2:


Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

Tired of these Ads? Purchase Enhanced Membership today to remove them!
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.