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notallthere

Safety

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I have a theory that what you enter the garage with you should exit it with. Depending on what you do your safety is going to vary but not becoming a hideous chud due to stupidity is not an option in my world. Some of the things you may want to consider the next time you go and buy that new toy.

Basics

Safety glasses

Gloves (not necessary with everything but not having them guarantees that you need them)

Steel toed boots

hearing protection

Grinding

Face sheild

welding hat (burning hair smells bad)

tight fitted gloves

long sleeved shirt

Welding

Apron

Sleeves

If not either of the above then a welding Jacket

Gloves

Welding helmet. This is not American Chopper so do not be an idiot.

Welding hat

Jack Stands -- If you say why then stop working on cars and take up drooling now.

I do cheat a little and put one pair of glasses, and headphones with every piece of equipment in the garage.

I know I missed stuff so feel free to chime in and add. I was a member of another forum when ones spouse chimed in to say he passed due to jack failure and his truck fell on him. We are all still to young.

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I was just thinking about this earlier. I'd recommend safety glasses for just about everything, even bleeding the brakes. I was pulling the bleed hose off and it came free suddenly and sprayed DOT3 all over my face and in my eyes. not a comfortable experience.

for grinding, I tend not to do long sleeves, but I use a faceshield.

for welding, I'd recommend pants that cover the tops of your shoes. I have had spatters go into my boots and they are uncomfortable to say the least. even worse was the pea-sized ball of liquid steel that went in there. that did a slight touch of damage.

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I always have a set of wheel chocks handy. Whenever the car has two wheels off the ground (especially the front wheels on a FWD car) I'll always chock the wheels still on the ground on top of having the E-brake on.

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Very nice. Luckily I have everything on base, I use a car lift for everything. ;)

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' date='Dec 29 2010, 10:14 PM' post='44926']

I always have a set of wheel chocks handy. Whenever the car has two wheels off the ground (especially the front wheels on a FWD car) I'll always chock the wheels still on the ground on top of having the E-brake on.

Another good tip. I always keep a pair of chocks handy to do just that.

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So I was out in the shop last night welding on the car and I realized something. I do not have any fire extinguishers. I went out to Home Depot and bought 3. $60.00 a piece is a small price to pay versus burning down the shop.

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One thing that I have learned is the industrial safety can be applied to home.

I was in the shop pulling the motor of a truck. Stupid me I asked for help. My buddy helping me walks under the hoist arm. He does not walk under a $40,000 forklift but he will walk under a $300.00 backyard engine hoist bought from O'reilly's.

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One thing that I have learned is the industrial safety can be applied to home.

I was in the shop pulling the motor of a truck. Stupid me I asked for help. My buddy helping me walks under the hoist arm. He does not walk under a $40,000 forklift but he will walk under a $300.00 backyard engine hoist bought from O'reilly's.

there can be other factors there. firstly the weight ratio is a little different... I'd rather not walk under a $40K lift thats holding 5000lbs of steel coil, but a $300 hoist thats holding 200lbs of engine isn't so bad.

secondly, if a forklift is high enough that you can walk under, the load is straight above where you woul walk. the engine hoist's load is out at the end of a lever and a chain. An engine hoist's load will hit the ground before the walk-under area goes away, but a forklift will crush everything in its way on the way down.

not trying to say don't be safe, but that you shouldn't be too hard on you buddy. I do think you're right about having standards though, such as regular inspections and PMs

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Also something that's not on the list; dust mask or respirator for grinding, sanding (especially fiberglass). :lol:

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Something that is not on the list but should be a must. A buddy that can help you move heavy stuff. Like transmissions particularly TH400s that weigh in excess of 170 lbs. Transmission 1 shoulder 0.

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An old skateboard might work. :P

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I was actually lifting it off the workbench down to a small rolling cart like a skateboard. The doctor wants me to go for x-rays but I do not want to commit to anything for it until the motor is back in the truck and running. Manual transmission in the Vibe plus disabled arm might not mix well.

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Manual transmission in the Vibe plus disabled arm might not mix well.

That sucks but it is doable to drive manual with a disabled arm, had to do it when I broke my collar bone back when I was still driving the Monte as a daily.

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I found something else that should be on the list. A first aid kit. A welding ember went between my sock and my safety shoes and burned through the sock. Nice quarter sized burn on my right foot. On the good note the boots were not hurt.

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Yes a REAL first aid kit. Also go down to the drug store and buy a LARGE bottle of eye wash, an instant ice pack, and a decent size box of gauze bandage in addition to the first aid kit as most kits are fairly weak in these areas.

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Always keep a wheel (fullsize spare is good) under a car when working on it off the ground. Id rather have the car fall on the wheel than me.

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My Dad use to make me keep a small board in the trunk to put under the jack in case I ever had to change a tire in the snow or on a dirt road for a better base. That way you will have a flat surface to put the jack on.

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Okay new lesson learned tonight. Always verify that the grinder wheel is on tight. Thankfully it was my air angle grinder and the wheel came off and got me in the side. Nice 5 inch mark on my chest right now from it.


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:o


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OUCH!


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Wow...very lucky man. That could have been a whole lot worse. Glad your OK. All I keep in the garage is cotton balls N duck tape. Soak the cotton ball in peroxide N tape over the prob. Make the tape tight N the pressure stops bleeding. Your covered with a gunk proof seal N good to go. LOL

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