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Diesel is dead at Porsche

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2018 Porsche MacanFor the past few years, it has been impossible to find a new diesel-fueled Porsche on dealer lots in the U.S. Soon, it will be impossible to find one anywhere in the world. Speaking with Britain's Autocar magazine, a Porsche spokesman cited the “cultural shift” of its customer base as the reason that the German automaker is...

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Heck, I didn't even know Porsche made a diesel. Then again, I don't really research or care much for them

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Parent company VW made the diesel engines for Porsche, VW, Audi, Scania, Skoda.....what does that tell you?

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47 minutes ago, Frosty said:

Parent company VW made the diesel engines for Porsche, VW, Audi, Scania, Skoda.....what does that tell you?

Figured it was from VW as most everything is shared there like GM. Scandal is my thoughts :lol: 

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I am sure the diesel scandal is part of it, since I think it extended into Europe too. I could be wrong on that but I thought the EU was investigating VW for possible EU emissions violations. However, given how high the price of petrol, gas or diesel, is in Europe, I think it may come down (in part) to fuel costs as well.

Ultimately it comes down to a lack of consumer demand for diesels - for whatever reasons. Gas and gas hybrids (according to the article) are on the rise. 

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2 hours ago, Frosty said:

I am sure the diesel scandal is part of it, since I think it extended into Europe too. I could be wrong on that but I thought the EU was investigating VW for possible EU emissions violations. However, given how high the price of petrol, gas or diesel, is in Europe, I think it may come down (in part) to fuel costs as well.

Ultimately it comes down to a lack of consumer demand for diesels - for whatever reasons. Gas and gas hybrids (according to the article) are on the rise. 

The main problem was and is with emissions. I worked with VW, Scania and Mercedes and a number of others for about 10 years trying to address the diesel issues. Unlike gas, the soot/particulate is a problem and in general not a simple one to rectify. If you dump it out the tailpipe it’s bad for health. If you dump it in the oil it’s bad for the engine. If you put particulate filters on the exhaust they plug, if you run lean to reduce particulate you create NoX, so you need a NoX filter and run a controller to run a rich/lean profile, or run a Urea system which is corrosive as hell.

The best choice is to make as little hard soot as possible and leave it in the oil. Soft soot is made first in the combustion process. There is a chemical mechanism that turns soft soot into hard soot. We found a way to majorly reduce that process! But as I explained elsewhere in this site that was stopped by an outside, AKA large oil company because the process extended drain intervals and they got wind of it. Big oil rules!

So since you can’t control hard soot production well enough without spending mega bucks to fix and maintain it there is no advantage in diesel.

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As always, I learn a new tidbit every time you post something like this Last Indian. 

I admit that I've never understood the allure of diesels in modern passenger cars. Car companies have offered them, extolled their respective virtues on them, and still the American car buying public (at least) remains wary. Europe has more openly embraced them, mainly for economic reasons  (e.g. diesel fuel has been cheaper than petrol unlike this country).

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On 2/23/2018 at 12:11 PM, Frosty said:

As always, I learn a new tidbit every time you post something like this Last Indian. 

I admit that I've never understood the allure of diesels in modern passenger cars. Car companies have offered them, extolled their respective virtues on them, and still the American car buying public (at least) remains wary. Europe has more openly embraced them, mainly for economic reasons  (e.g. diesel fuel has been cheaper than petrol unlike this country).

As I do likewise with you! :cheers: You’re always a interesting read! 

What you speculate with Europe is is true. Also their highway system, towne arrangments, parking/garages etc in general is much different. Much narrower, tighter & congested. So diesels offer more punch in a smaller package than gas did. Now with reliability of turbos being much improved, direct injection & all the additional improvements in engine technologies the gas engine package has been greatly reduced in size. That in addition with, heaven help us, electric vehicles, diesels have become to costly in comparison and thusly expendable.

Back in 1983 my father-in-law (the Corsair pilot) & I built a 2 seater Triumph Spitfire with a 3 cylinder Kabota engine (18 hp) if I remember right. This car got 100 mpg would go 60 mph on the freeway and pulled like the dickens. Quick, no! Acceleration, no, but it was still pretty neat. It was called a Centurion. You used the Triumph’s frame & running gears, built the body out of plywood, urethane foam board & fiberglass.

This car once resided in the Crawford Auto-Aviation Museum along with his Cleveland Air Race memorabilia. Though Crawford gave up the aviation part, so I’ve lost touch with where those things are now. Although his Thompson Air Race Trophy reside at the Pensacola Navel Museum.

Edited by Last Indian

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