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Pontiac of the Month

Shakercars's 1972 Trans Am

2019 August
of the Month

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  • Posts

    • Welcome to the site great looking old wagon... Noticed you said that the straight 8 engine was seized up.....Was it seized due to a mechanical failure or just rusted (rings to the bores..possibly from moisture over the years...??) The reason I ask is....Years ago my dad came up with an old Cadillac (1949) that had been sitting in an old shed for years and the engine was locked up...So what we did was use a process called electrolysis...Basically what we did was reverse the oxidation process using a car battery and charger and an electrolyte made out of water and washing soda (sodium bicarbonate) If I remember correctly he used right at one tablespoon of washing soda to one gallon of water...So we pulled the engine out of the car and removed the intake manifold..valve covers...water pump...oil pan.... timing cover ... freeze plugs ETC...Then submerged the engine in a plastic kids wading pool large enough to completely get the whole engine underwater then added the washing soda to the water and mixed it up really good so as to be sure it did not clump up....Then from the 12 volt car battery using jumper cables hooked the ground to the engine block which turned it into a cathode....Then we used a piece of steel rebar as an anode which we hooked the positive cable to the hot side of the battery then submerged the rebar in the solution placing it real close to but not touching the engine block with about 6 inches or so sticking up above the water level where the positive lead was hooked to....The rebar will be consumed during the process so you would need to keep an eye on it and replace as necessary...so that the positive cable does not become submerged into the electrolyte solution...It is a slow process took about three weeks to clean and derust the Caddy engine...It worked really well and when it was done...We rolled it over by hand with very little effort...The black powder residue that was left  on the engine came right off with stiff brush...Then the engine was quite easily disassembled any wearable parts replaced reinstalled in the car and was driven across country to Seattle from North Carolina and back with no issues.....I am sure that I have missed a few details as this was 30 some years ago..... Electrolysis Might be something worthwhile to  check into if you want to reuse the original engine......Good luck with your project and keep us posted..... TLBT      
    • Looks like a nice project. Goy any pics of it now?
    • Hi, I am carld83 and have been working on this car for a few years now. The pic is how I found her, drug her home from a farmers pasture. Slowly acquiring pieces and parts to get her back on the road. Got her running and moving under her own power. Brakes have been gone through. But still need a little work. Wish me luck.
    • Thanks my friend! Like pretty much everything else, it’s what’s underneath that counts! Or at least counts as much. Or the devil’s in the detail!
    • According to gtcarlot.com, GT convertible production was 20.8% of the 150,001 G6s sold in the US in 2007. So that is around 31,200 total.
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